[multi_array] Feature request: constructor and resize from values

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[multi_array] Feature request: constructor and resize from values

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I'd love to be able to use multi_array with classes that do not have a default constructor. At the moment, this is impossible, as both the constructor and resize functions only take extents as arguments (and possibly some other options), but no value_type, as for example std::vector does. Thus, trying to store objects without a default constructor in a multi_array results in hard compiler errors, with no workaround that I know of.

This happens to me fairly often, as I use multi_array to organize sets of complex objects. If there is a technical reason why this is not possible, I would also be happy to learn it.

Best regards,
Eugenio Bargiacchi

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Re: [multi_array] Feature request: constructor and resize from values

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As you don't give any example, I can't know exactly what you want to do. But how about using multi_array to store pointers? Then you can construct your objects at any time.

On Fri, Nov 20, 2020 at 11:55 PM Eugenio Bargiacchi via Boost-users <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'd love to be able to use multi_array with classes that do not have a default constructor. At the moment, this is impossible, as both the constructor and resize functions only take extents as arguments (and possibly some other options), but no value_type, as for example std::vector does. Thus, trying to store objects without a default constructor in a multi_array results in hard compiler errors, with no workaround that I know of.

This happens to me fairly often, as I use multi_array to organize sets of complex objects. If there is a technical reason why this is not possible, I would also be happy to learn it.

Best regards,
Eugenio Bargiacchi
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Re: [multi_array] Feature request: constructor and resize from values

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Ah, sorry, I thought it would have been automatically clear. Consider this example:

class A {
    public:
        A(int) {}
};

boost::multi_array<A,2> array(boost::extents[2][2]); // Compiler error
boost::multi_array<A,2> array(boost::extents[2][2], A(3)); // What I would like

array.resize(boost::extents[2][2]); // Again, compiler error
array.resize(boost::extents[2][2], A(2)); // What I would like

The variable `array` cannot be constructed in any way, as multi_array will try to default-construct it, and that will fail. Trying to simply create `array` with its default constructor works (although it will obviously be a zero-sized array), but when trying to resize it (to actually store things), the same thing will happen.

Using pointers could work, but it's simply not viable, as it requires me to do memory management manually. I simply do not wish to do so, and it kind of runs contrary to modern C++ practices. I could use `unique_ptr`, but it feels more convoluted than it should be (along with requiring an additional layer of unneeded indirection). I feel multi_array should be capable of being constructed from existing values, just as `std::vector` and other standard containers can do.

Would this be possible?

On Sun, Nov 22, 2020 at 6:07 AM kila suelika via Boost-users <[hidden email]> wrote:
As you don't give any example, I can't know exactly what you want to do. But how about using multi_array to store pointers? Then you can construct your objects at any time.

On Fri, Nov 20, 2020 at 11:55 PM Eugenio Bargiacchi via Boost-users <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'd love to be able to use multi_array with classes that do not have a default constructor. At the moment, this is impossible, as both the constructor and resize functions only take extents as arguments (and possibly some other options), but no value_type, as for example std::vector does. Thus, trying to store objects without a default constructor in a multi_array results in hard compiler errors, with no workaround that I know of.

This happens to me fairly often, as I use multi_array to organize sets of complex objects. If there is a technical reason why this is not possible, I would also be happy to learn it.

Best regards,
Eugenio Bargiacchi
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Re: [multi_array] Feature request: constructor and resize from values

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In reply to this post by Boost - Users mailing list
If an object does not have a default constructor what could it mean to have a block of memory holding one that has not been initialized?  How would your program know if the object had been properly initialized or not?

There are three ways to address this:

1 - A pointer, as already mentioned.  A null pointer means the spot does not refer to ("contain") a valid object -- or any object at all.

2 - use a variant

3 - create a default constructor (which you could do by changing the signature of your constructor to something like (int = 0) or (int = -1) assuming those values are invalid).

In all cases, regardless of semantics or implementation you'll either have to check at runtime for a valid object OR, if you know for other reasons which locations are valid, use the default constructor with any value you'd like.

If you don't want to use pointers there are a couple of other possibilities:


Date: Sun, 22 Nov 2020 12:06:04 +0100
From: Eugenio Bargiacchi <[hidden email]>

Ah, sorry, I thought it would have been automatically clear. Consider this
example:

class A {
   public:
       A(int) {}
};

boost::multi_array<A,2> array(boost::extents[2][2]); // Compiler error
boost::multi_array<A,2> array(boost::extents[2][2], A(3)); // What I would
like

array.resize(boost::extents[2][2]); // Again, compiler error
array.resize(boost::extents[2][2], A(2)); // What I would like

The variable `array` cannot be constructed in any way, as multi_array will
try to default-construct it, and that will fail. Trying to simply create
`array` with its default constructor works (although it will obviously be a
zero-sized array), but when trying to resize it (to actually store things),
the same thing will happen.


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