[Boost.Python] C++/Python Hybrid App in 2020

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[Boost.Python] C++/Python Hybrid App in 2020

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Hi all,

I read on the Boost.Python FAQ that for Mac OSX users, the library is currently known only to work with the GCC compiler. Thus far, I have been using clang++. I will make the switch, so long that it does increase my odds of encountering difficulties down the road.

What do we think here? In the context of front-end dev in Python for a C++ application, is Boost.Python worth making the switch from clang++ to gcc? Would I be better off using something else (i.e. wxPython)?

I really love using Boost (I've found use for Test, Signals2, and Asio), but I don't want to let my Boost bias lead me to make a poor choice.

I know this question is a tad subjective; I apologize for that. I would like the Python extension to be as seamless as possible, and I am only going to be using Python for front-end code. The interface between the two would likely be with sockets. 

I am sure I could answer this myself via experimentation, but I wanted to get a feel from the Boost community before doing so.

Thanks in advance!

- AJ

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Re: [Boost.Python] C++/Python Hybrid App in 2020

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While I do realize this is strictly about Python, I’m finding myself at odds with the idea of Boost working only with GCC. 

Xcode lets you compile C/C++ programs that use Boost by using clang. It’s somewhat become the default compiler nowadays for development in both desktop & mobile.

Or am I missing something here?

- Heriberto.

El 21 feb. 2020, a las 13:02, Andrew McFarlane via Boost-users <[hidden email]> escribió:

Hi all,

I read on the Boost.Python FAQ that for Mac OSX users, the library is currently known only to work with the GCC compiler. Thus far, I have been using clang++. I will make the switch, so long that it does increase my odds of encountering difficulties down the road.

What do we think here? In the context of front-end dev in Python for a C++ application, is Boost.Python worth making the switch from clang++ to gcc? Would I be better off using something else (i.e. wxPython)?

I really love using Boost (I've found use for Test, Signals2, and Asio), but I don't want to let my Boost bias lead me to make a poor choice.

I know this question is a tad subjective; I apologize for that. I would like the Python extension to be as seamless as possible, and I am only going to be using Python for front-end code. The interface between the two would likely be with sockets. 

I am sure I could answer this myself via experimentation, but I wanted to get a feel from the Boost community before doing so.

Thanks in advance!

- AJ
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https://lists.boost.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/boost-users


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Re: [Boost.Python] C++/Python Hybrid App in 2020

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Absolutely, Heriberto, I agree 100%, though all of the Boost libraries I have used to-date are indeed compatible with g++/clang++ (Asio, Signals2, Test).

IMHO, all Boost libs should ideally adhere to this standard, though I realize I could very well be asking for a lot there. After all, we aren't the ones contributing to Boost libraries (at least I'm not, for now).

More on Boost.Python, it seems to have fallen a little out of scope... It's newest version is 1.66.0 while most others are at 1.72.0 **sad face**

Does the team on that front require assistance, or is Boost.Python that low on the list of priorities? Not meaning to come off as rude, I am just curious.

- AJ


On Fri, Feb 21, 2020 at 3:50 PM Heriberto Delgado <[hidden email]> wrote:
While I do realize this is strictly about Python, I’m finding myself at odds with the idea of Boost working only with GCC. 

Xcode lets you compile C/C++ programs that use Boost by using clang. It’s somewhat become the default compiler nowadays for development in both desktop & mobile.

Or am I missing something here?

- Heriberto.

El 21 feb. 2020, a las 13:02, Andrew McFarlane via Boost-users <[hidden email]> escribió:

Hi all,

I read on the Boost.Python FAQ that for Mac OSX users, the library is currently known only to work with the GCC compiler. Thus far, I have been using clang++. I will make the switch, so long that it does increase my odds of encountering difficulties down the road.

What do we think here? In the context of front-end dev in Python for a C++ application, is Boost.Python worth making the switch from clang++ to gcc? Would I be better off using something else (i.e. wxPython)?

I really love using Boost (I've found use for Test, Signals2, and Asio), but I don't want to let my Boost bias lead me to make a poor choice.

I know this question is a tad subjective; I apologize for that. I would like the Python extension to be as seamless as possible, and I am only going to be using Python for front-end code. The interface between the two would likely be with sockets. 

I am sure I could answer this myself via experimentation, but I wanted to get a feel from the Boost community before doing so.

Thanks in advance!

- AJ
_______________________________________________
Boost-users mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.boost.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/boost-users


_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
https://lists.boost.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/boost-users